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When the Assyrian rulers withdrew from Cilicia between 650 and 630 B.C.,

Kandelaberkaktus, Santa Cruz, Galapagos
Kandelaberkaktus, Santa Cruz, Galapagos

Homer and his fellow scribes became unemployed. They cultivated the art of poetry and gave lessons, preferably in astronomy, in order to turn hungry landlubbers into navigation-safe sailors.

 

The excellent astronomical star charts of the Assyrians, with whose help Thales of Miletus could later predict the solar eclipse of 28 May 585 B.C., helped them to learn astronomy.

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My letter to the editor of 5 February 2008 (continued):

Young blue-footed boobies, Isabela, Galapagos
Young blue-footed boobies, Isabela, Galapagos

As a result of precession the constellations shift. From about 4400 B.C. to 2200 B.C. the constellation “Taurus” was the spring constellation, from about 2200 B.C. until the birth of Christ the “Aries” (Aries Point). Afterwards it was until today the “Pisces”, which are replaced now by the “Aquarius” (Aquarius Age).

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