220

The explanation:

(1)Tradition and a new beginning:

Raoul Schrott shows in his book “Homers Heimat” (Homer’s Homeland)

Cormorant, Fernandina, Galapagos
Cormorant, Fernandina, Galapagos

the rootedness of the Iliad stories in Cilicia, in the Greek cities of Cilicia. These Greek cities were threatened by the expansion of the Assyrian Empire in the 8th and 7th centuries BC and successfully defended themselves.

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218

Homer’s Iliad: The Fall of Assyria – presented in an astronomical educational poem (a star catalogue)

Pelican, Rapida, Galapagos
Pelican, Rapida, Galapagos

Prohibitions of thinking, dogmatism and a lack of imaginative power are the end of all science.

 

Joachim Bauer, Das kooperative Gen, 2008

Symposion: Homer – Troia – Kilikien, University of Innsbruck, 13 and 14 November 2008 (on Raoul Schrott: Homers Heimat. Der Kampf um Troja und seine realen Hintergründe, München 2008)

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217

My letter to the editor from 5 February 2008 (5th continuation):

Pelican, Rapida, Galapagos
Pelican, Rapida, Galapagos

The worthy councillor Joseph of Arimathea dares to ask the victor Pilate for the intact corpse of Jesus and receives it in order to bury it worthily – just as the aged Priamos has the courage to ask Achill for the intact corpse of Hector and receives it, Iliad XXIV.

 

The resurrection of Jesus cannot be told by Mark (fake Mark’s conclusion), because the Iliad ends with the funeral celebrations for Hector.

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216

My letter to the editor from 5 February 2008 (4th continuation):

Pelicans and Blue-footed Boobies, Rapida, Galapagos
Pelicans and Blue-footed Boobies, Rapida, Galapagos

In Galilee Mark compares Jesus to Achill, the strongest hero of the Greeks. Just as Achill only intervenes in the fighting after the death of his friend Patroclus, Jesus only begins the proclamation when his forerunner John the Baptist is imprisoned.

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214

My letter to the editor from 5 February 2008 (2nd continuation):

North Seymor, Galapagos
North Seymor, Galapagos

The change from one spring constellation to the next meant a collapse of the old order and the beginning of a new era for ancient man.

 

Like a good historical novel, Homer’s Iliad describes the collapse of an old city-state system of rule and the beginning of a new age of natural and enterprising aristocratic warriors. It shows how the earthly order around the rich city state of Troy, which had been firmly established for a long time, came to an end with the inevitability of a clockwork.

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